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20110710
20110710
STATION
CSPAN 2
CSPAN2 2
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 11:00pm EDT
uranium in south africa, but pakistan has always been this focused and there's a reason it's the most dangerous place on earth it's the fifth largest nuclear power and 110 nuclear weapons it's estimated they have more terrorist groups per square mile than any other place you can find in that region as you might suspect from the fact binh two -- bin laden had been there a number of years and the security service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installatio
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 9:30am EDT
africa. that pakistan has always been his focus, and there's a reason it's the most dangerous place on earth. it's the fifth largest nuclear power. up to 100 nuclear weapons. it's estimated they have more terrorist groups for square-mile and in a place you can find in that region. as we might suspect from the fact that bin laden had the planes fly for years, their security service, the isi has close ties to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a numbe
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 8:00pm EDT
, the india-pakistan war, which still defiance in many ways what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career, end of his life, in 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically. to him, the cold war -- the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia. his basic thesis was communism is dead in russia, but democracy has not yet won. for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about the leaders in russia, speaking on the topic. he gets a call from president palin ton. they had a conversation about clinton's russia policy. you can see in the squept months clinton russian policy change along the advice that was given by richard nixon. that is, as i see it, the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's eulogy. he talks about the last time he saw president nixon at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. without a note, president nixon stood and delivered a compelling speech, captures the global scene and sharing his visio
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)